Catastrophe, Memory, and Narrative: Comparative Responses to Atrocity in the Twentieth Century
General Catalog Course Title:
Catastrophe, Memory, and Narrative: Comparative Responses to Atrocity in the Twentieth Century
Terms Offered:
Spring 2013
Instructor: 
Tansman, Alan
Instructor: 
Puckett, Kent

In what ways are texts produced during times of war (poems, paintings, films, political pamphlets, historical records, philosophical treatises, etc.) about war? This course addresses cultures of war across the globe (in particular in Japan and Europe) by exploring the relationship between the shaping forces of war (and other protracted periods of depredation) and various social and cultural forms. Questions considered during the course include: What does it mean to be about war? In what way are texts proximate to—in or around, before, during, or after—war also necessarily about war even (perhaps especially) when they seem not to be? In what ways might the trace of war remain in cultural texts that work to be about something else?

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